Book Review: Ripley’s Believe It or Not

43242446

Ripley’s Believe It or Not

*This review may contain spoilers pertaining to some content found in Ripley’s Believe It or Not, though it is minimal spoilage*

I am thus far finding Ripley’s Believe It or Not, the graphic novel, intriguing. It is different than other novels, of the graphic variety, that I have followed because it contains more than one story within its pages. I am one of the lucky NetGalley members who was approved to read this book pre-publication, and therefore, it was a free / no cost to me read. However, if I were to have purchased this, the multitude of stories has a more bang for the buck feel to it.

I think that the text is appropriate for most ages; profanity is implied with symbols @$! However, I would not give this to a small child but mid – late teens would be an appropriate audience, I think. (Keep in mind, I don’t have my own children. So, for all I know, I just became the bad aunt for giving someone’s kid a book they shouldn’t be reading). Some of the images are graphic (heeyyyooooo). For example, in the second story, the main character, Phineas Gage, gets a railroad spike through the left side his brain and face due to an explosion gone awry. Though the image is not what I would consider gory, it may still be disturbing to a young audience.

One of my favorite aspects of this novel is the use of color. In particular, I think that the illustrator did a wonderful job giving each story its own color scheme.

Overall, I most enjoyed the tidbits of history I learned from reading this entertaining piece of work, most of which I was entirely unaware. I rate this one a 3.5 – 4. Ripley’s Believe It or Not was colorful, interesting, and enlightening.

Advertisements

Book Review: Girl, Wash Your Face

My 2019 (Goodreads) reading goal is 67 books.  Between the 1st of January and today, I’ve finished 10 books via a combination of reading and listening.  I have written several reviews on GR that I have yet to post in my blog.  If you follow my blog, I apologize in advance for the multiple email notifications you are about to endure indicating that I have posted new content.

3928180328129

Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are So You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be

I am cognizant that the intention of this book is to uplift and empower women, buttttttttttttt it felt more like a platform for Ms. Hollis to spew her greatness. Furthermore, there’s an underlying implication that the reader is sucking at life but just unaware of their inevitable suckage.

Girl, dismount from that high horse and shimmy on down that pedestal.

Are there a few aspects that I can relate to? Yes. I too am overworked, over tired, facing the daily grind can be a struggle, I’m riddled with stress and anxiety, and I’m not a perfect Christian. What I cannot relate to – the need to tout my perception of my own greatness. If you want to build women up, you encourage them – simple as that. You don’t rain shiznit on others’ parade because their goal isn’t buying a $1000.00 purse. Some of us feel like we’ve “made it” if we pay ALL of our bills on time in one month. Granted, I am certain that this result was entirely unintentional. I know for certain that Rachel did not sit down and ponder, “How can I make people feel really poorly about the life they already think is great, even though by my standard of living, it’s mundane and utterly ordinary and therefore, it’s wrong and baaaaadddd?”

I’m not saying that Rachel should not be proud of her accomplishments, she clearly has many under her belt – yay for you and good for you, seriously. What I’m saying is . . . don’t shove your successes down others’ throats and disguise this assault as uplifting, motivating, and inspiring. Having a successful business, writing books, and speaking keynote are all wonderful, but some people are rocking at life if they just make it through the day without giving someone a good ol’ throat punch, and that is OKay too.

*At first, I thought that perhaps my interpretation of this book is based on my own insecurities and deemed failures – this is what Rachel Hollis would have you believe, for if you don’t like what the book contains, it’s obviously on YOU and YOUR perception – it couldn’t possibly be because of her and her tone, but I digress. Like I was writing . . . originally, I thought that my dislike of the book was solely on me, but in reading copious GR reviews just now, I’m NOT the only one who was rubbed the wrong way.

I think something that Ms. Hollis should tuck under her cap and practice is BE HUMBLE.